Wednesday, August 17, 2016

5 Reasons I'd Give My Left Thumb To Work A "Regular" Job

Disclaimer: This is NOT meant to put down anybody or any job or profession. Merely me professing how I feel.

"You don't know what it's like working a normal job." 

"Trust me, be glad you get to stay at home."

"Why can't you work? You look so healthy!"

"You are SO lucky. You get to write all day."

I've heard all of these, in one form or another. In each instance, every single time, it hurts. Let me enlighten you why I wished and hoped against hope that I could work a "normal" job. Yes, sure, there is one perk, and that is me getting to watch Syrus grow up from the stay-at-home mom perspective. But that is really the only perk to this situation. Here's the top five reasons that I'd give my left thumb to work a regular 9-5 job. 

Bringing In Money For My Family

Yes, sure, I bring in some money for my family via blogging and freelance writing. But trust me, that it is far and few in between. Once again, we don't even have our own place together. My husband works part time as a fish monger, and I try to do my best to write as much as I can, when I can. I wished that I had even just a part-time job so I could bring in a bit of a more steady income. 


Sure, I know a lot of people do not like their co-workers. But some people do. I don't get much of a chance to get out of the house, unless it is with my husband, taking me to a doctors or therapy appointment. Trust me that neither of those allow me to make "friends" or even "accquaintences." People I could invite over for dinner. You see what I'm getting at, right?

I Never Had The Chance

Some people contract chronic illness when they are older, after they have had a career. Now, don't take this the wrong way. I know full well that there are others that are in the same exact boat as me. Those who never had the chance at all to work a job. Like so many others struck down by chronic illness, I wanted to have a career, too. 

I Even Went To A Technical Vocational School

During my first year of high school, I was way too ill to attend high school. I contracted chronic Epstein-Barr virus after a bout of mononucleosis. It was awful. I was in bed all the time. This was also before we knew I had endometriosis. So pile chronic pelvic pain on top of it, and I was a miserable walking, hormonal teenage mess of a girl. But I managed to convince my parents to let me try going to high school. I originally was going to go for culinary, but had a panic attack the first day and actually pulled myself out of school entirely. The next day, I went back to sign back up, but my spot had been taken. So I opted to go for Medical Arts. I either wanted to be a pastry chef or help people as a dietitian. I made it through my sophomore year, which by the end I needed home tutoring for. I made it three weeks into my junior year. I had to finish high school at home via homeschooling. Talk about a crushing blow. 

But You Get To Write All The Time

Yes, this is true. But I can't write all the time. Because the reality is, I'm still sick. I get tired so easily, so I have to dole out my time wisely between Syrus and my jobs. Writing had never even crossed my mind as a viable option to bring in some supplemental income until I met my husband, who drew out my creative side. I had always loved writing, being on any and all school newspapers I could be in. I began with a local newspaper, but when they stopped paying me, I went to online journalism, mostly about parenting, which, to be honest, I knew zero about. Like most new moms, I was flying by the seat of my pants, but somehow, I got to write for some big name sites like What To Expect, Lifescript and HuffPost. I love it now, but it was a long time coming. Once I picked up on blogging and began to make some supplemental income off of that, I fell in love with it. 

So, yes. I am too young to have these conditions. Yes, I do want a job. No, I don't enjoy it all that much to stay at home. But I have these conditions. I'm learning day by day to live with them, even after 12 years of diagnoses. That's the best anyone can do is learn as we go along the path of life. No matter what. 

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